French Baguettes

Saturday, January 10th, 2015
Ingredients

  • 1 packet of Fleischman’s active dry yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1 cup warm water (105° to 115°F)
  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • Olive oil

Directions

1. In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast and sugar in the warm water and let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes.

2. Oil the inside of a large bowl into which the dough will be put to rise

3. Combine the flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade, and process with 3 or 4 pulses.

4. With the food processor running, pour the yeast mixture down the feed tube in a steady stream.

5. Continue processing until the dough forms a ball and cleans the sides of the bowl, about 30 seconds. Process for an additional 30 seconds to a minute more to knead the dough.

6. Turn the dough out of the food processor and form into a ball

7. Place the dough in the oiled bowl. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let the dough rise for four or five hours in a warm place. It is during the long rising process that the fermenting dough fully develops its flavor

8. At the end of the first rise punch dough down, knead by hand for a couple of minutes, form into a ball and put back in the bowl to rise for another two hours

9. At the end of the second rise, punch down and knead for a couple of minutes

10. Cut dough in half and form into two baguettes

11. Place baguettes on greased baking sheet and slit the tops with a sharp paring knife

12. Let rise for 45 minutes

13. Bake in a preheated 450 degree oven for about 25-30 minutes

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